Jazz Up Those Static Dodeca Views With Advanced Essbase Features

Oftentimes when I am demonstrating or teaching aspects of Dodeca to people, they are amazed at the sheer number of options and configurations that are available on a view. Fortunately, I am able to tell them that yes, there are many, many options – and they are there if you need or want them, but they won’t get in your way. The defaults are very sensible and getting a basic Essbase-based Dodeca view running is incredibly easy.

Another thing to keep in mind is that for the most part, the extreme amount of options and flexibility we have on a single view is often available to us in lieu of code. So, tasks that typically required some non-trivial amount of VBA code are now completely code free. When we need some advanced functionality that isn’t available out of the box, we can use Workbook Scripts, which is an event-driven scripting technology that is particularly well suited to working with spreadsheets and the data contained in them.

That all said, today I want to walk through a bit of a cross-functional example that starts with a very typical Dodeca view based on an Essbase retrieve range, then enhance it to give our users the ability to zoom in on the different time periods in the view without having to rebuild the view. So we’re going to blur the line a bit between static and dynamic reports, and our users are going to enjoy some additional flexibility and convenience with regard to their reporting (and keeping users happy is always a good thing, right?).

Continue Reading…

Dodeca Techniques – Auto Load Windows User Name During Relational Input

Today I want to look at a practical example in Dodeca that came up while I was at a Dodeca training workshop for a client the other week. We know that Dodeca can update data in a relational database using its robust SQL Passthrough DataSet functionality. And we know that it can automatically use values from the selectors to update columns as needed (for example, if the user has selected a Scenario of Actual, we could use a token such as [T.Scenario] in the SQL query).

Now let’s say that we have a table with data, such as headcount forecast data, and for whatever reason (auditing), we want to record the username of the user that is inputting the data. To achieve this, we can use a single Workbook Script method and a function to dynamically insert the Windows username of the current user into the view, and then use that token just as we would use any other token. In this case, we’ll use that token in the INSERT/UPDATE statements on the SQL Passthrough DataSet. Note that none of this configuration has anything to do with security, per se, it’s purely to have a column in the table to make it easy to see who updated/inserted a given piece of data.

Continue Reading…